Leonardo da Vinci once said, “In rivers, the water that you touch is the last of what has passed and the first of that which comes; so with present time.” The close relationship between water and time may be the reason why humans are so driven to the water’s edge time and time again, and why so many San Antonio locals are loving the new River’s Reach Riverwalk.

Riverwalk

Reminiscing about this past summer, most of my favorite moments, regardless of the brevity, were the ones in which I found myself called to the water. Luckily in returning to my college town of San Antonio, I found a renewed commitment to incorporating natural water into the day-to-day. Several months ago, San Antonio invested large amounts into the building of the River’s Reach, expanding local access to the waterways that draw many visitors to the city every year.

Riverwalk

I remember in college never setting foot on the Riverwalk unless family or out-of-town friends were passing through. Possibly, special dinners would be arranged near the Riverwalk, but seldom did we actively decide to enjoy the Riverwalk.

The new construction allows quieter and more livable experiences for those in San Antonio, allowing for the enjoyment of something so beloved. Connecting the King Williams’ District with downtown up through to the Pearl Brewery District, the River’s Reach is spacious, beautiful, and practical. Cyclists, joggers, and paddleboarders each have spots along the river.

Riverwalk

 New apartment lofts were springing up, tucked into the groves and turns of the neighborhoods’ riverbanks.

 I walked the River’s Reach from brunch at the Guenther House and Mill about 45 minutes to reach my hotel in downtown San Antonio, further up the river past all the tourists. Which was why I visited in the first place, isn’t it? I wanted to enjoy the city, reconnect with my past college experiences as they related to who I was today, and touch a bit more of the water of time. The last thing on my mind was sightseeing the tourists.

Riverwalk

 Not that great people-watching can’t occur with a paleta outside the Alamo, but I needed to guidance of the water to help navigate some of the turns that were occurring in own my life. To remember what the ease of trusting your instincts was like even if you can’t see beyond the bend ahead. I needed to walk a bit further; be pushed to round just a few more corners. With a stomach full of biscuits and gravy, I wandered around the various historic districts of San Antonio, always returning back to the water’s edge to continue onward, the river waving at both my arrivals and my departures.

Riverwalk


Do you ever feel compelled to spend an afternoon following along a riverwalk? Join the conversation in the comment section below!

Riverwalk

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